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Extend Stornoway house

Planning permission is being sought to extend a house within the Stornoway Conservation Area - by replacing some unused cells from the town's former police station. .

Applicant Christine Macintosh of 41 Kenneth Street wants to extend the property to create more living space for her young family.

According to the supporting information submitted, the current building is a two-storey, three-bedroom dwelling. A building on the site appears on a Stornoway map dating back to 1850, while a 1919 map shows a similar-sized building with a rear extension. 

It is thought that 41 Kenneth Street was a police station and is labelled as such on a 1950 map. However, the rear extension shown in the 1919 map is believed to have been the cells.

Says the supporting information: “It is understood that a Police Station was in operation on the site up until 1967 when the new station was completed around the corner on Church Street. A former resident at 41 Kenneth Street was able to confirm that the Police Station was still attached to the dwelling in 1968 when she first moved into the property and was demolished a couple of years later.”

The assumption is that the police station was demolished, but the cells and the main dwelling were retained. Other than replacement windows and new fascias/guttering, the dwelling has been largely unaltered since the station was demolished, the supporting information points out.

Consent to demolish the cells has previously been approved, creating the space necessary to extend the dwelling. However, it is conceded: “Whilst not necessarily in keeping with the architecture of the surrounding properties, the applicant is seeking to create a substantial extension but with minimal impact on the Conservation Area. The flat roof construction is necessary to enable the first-floor bedroom windows to be retained while also keeping the height of the development to a minimum.”

Restore areas of degraded peat

Hebridean Housing Partnership Ltd. is seeking planning consent to restore an area of degraded peatland using peat excavated to construct the new 72-house Blackwater development.

Work on the already approved housing estate on land owned by Stornoway Trust has yet to begin. The proposal before the Comhairle is a management plan for dealing with the peat that will be extracted 

It is being proposed that the peat removed from the site be utilised to restore neighbouring moorland containing many disused peat banks 

Trial pit investigations have determined that the average depth of peat is 0.67 metres. Based on these findings, it is estimated that approximately 6,700m3 of peat will be disturbed.

However, the peat management plan notes: “However, due to the fact that a large portion of this peat is to be found in deposits of less than 0.5m deep, it is expected that a significant amount of this can be used on-site in landscaping along with imported topsoil.”

Cut back a tree

A tree encroaching on adjoining properties will be cut down to size if the Comhairle agrees on consent for the work.

The tree, within the Stornoway Conservation Area, is located at the Mission Hall, 38 Bayhead.